Cptsd or not Cptsd?

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Libby183

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Re: Cptsd or not Cptsd?
« Reply #15 on: December 17, 2018, 02:21:22 PM »
Just wondering how you are doing, the truth?

I agree with absolutely everything you said in your previous response. It is almost as if, once you have experienced how truly awful people can be, it is hard to live with people, to go along with social convention, even to chat about seemingly inconsequential things. I fought against this feeling for so long, tried to fit in, but now I just accept the isolation.

I hope you don't mind me telling you about my son, who was diagnosed with Aspergers syndrome, aged five. At about age 18, he took it upon himself to get his diagnosis removed. It was a very positive thing for him. He is still very unusual, but he has accepted himself, and pretty much, everyone else does. He has actually been quite an inspiration to me. To accept myself and not be defined by a "diagnosis".

All the best to you and please keep in touch.

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thetruth

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Re: Cptsd or not Cptsd?
« Reply #16 on: December 17, 2018, 10:42:24 PM »
Just wondering how you are doing, the truth?

I agree with absolutely everything you said in your previous response. It is almost as if, once you have experienced how truly awful people can be, it is hard to live with people, to go along with social convention, even to chat about seemingly inconsequential things. I fought against this feeling for so long, tried to fit in, but now I just accept the isolation.

I hope you don't mind me telling you about my son, who was diagnosed with Aspergers syndrome, aged five. At about age 18, he took it upon himself to get his diagnosis removed. It was a very positive thing for him. He is still very unusual, but he has accepted himself, and pretty much, everyone else does. He has actually been quite an inspiration to me. To accept myself and not be defined by a "diagnosis".

All the best to you and please keep in touch.

Hi Libby,

That is a very positive decision, and a positive story about your son. Im glad you are able to draw strength from his example.

I am doing ok thanks. I have to think about my past all the time but I am at that phase of the cycle where it isnt crippling me and I am able to identify some truly positive thoughts. In ways it makes me jealous of some other people, and maybe of the old pre-abuse me, who doesnt have to think about the same thing all the time.

I find this thought usually leads on to other thoughts- the old me was blissfully ignorant of what was to come and how it would challenge my life quality. I find this then makes me reflect mindfully on the present because for all I know there is tragedy ahead. So therefore I should focus on and appreciate whatever blissful ignorance I am currently enjoying!?!!?

Somehow this train of thought helps me. It helps me to think, hey, things arent all that bad. Look at the positives. Build on the positives. If nothing else, know there are gaps in the intrusive thinking when I am ok, like right now. ..know there are gaps and enjoy them. By gap I mean times of being relatively untroubled.

For whatever reason, I am having a chilled evening and things are ok my end. I reallyu hope they are ok your end too.
« Last Edit: December 17, 2018, 11:44:09 PM by thetruth »

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thetruth

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Re: Cptsd or not Cptsd?
« Reply #17 on: December 21, 2018, 05:24:08 PM »
Many of us here self-diagnose thetruth, mainly because physicians and mental health professionals do not yet know about Complex PTSD/Trauma, in particular in situations such as workplace abuse. 

However, many do and this is reflected in the fact that the International Society for Traumatic Stress Studies has a Complex Trauma Special Interest Group - https://www.istss.org/about-istss/special-interest-groups/complex-trauma-sig.aspx.  Also, while Complex PTSD/Trauma is not yet in the APA's DSM as an official diagnosis, it has just been included in the WHO's ICD and much of that is due to the push by mental health professionals to have it recognized so that people like us around the world can get the treatment, services & support we so need whether it's because of abuse in childhood or adulthood. 

I guess my point is don't let ignorance stop you from what you know to be true. Keep trying to find a GP and/or T who is knowledgeable and will help you, not tell you you are just too sensitive.  Abuse in the workplace is a very real issue which can definitely lead to developing CPTSD; as Rainagain points out just Google that to confirm what you already know in your heart.   

Kizzie,

Thanks a lot for this. I am finally reading your link. Challenging day today. It was hard to do Christmas shopping on such trying emotions but I got a surprising amount done and survived a lengthy conversation with a neighbour. Very tiring, have to do it all again tomorrow.