Health effects over a lifetime of childhood trauma (might be triggering)

  • 4 Replies
  • 1736 Views
*

keepfighting

  • Member
  • 409
  • I'm not broken just bent
    • View Profile
http://www.ted.com/talks/nadine_burke_harris_how_childhood_trauma_affects_health_across_a_lifetime

She has some good and clear ideas of how to orevent and minimize the negative effects of childhood trauma when/before it happens.

It was a bit triggering for me, since I am already facing some of the ill health effects of childhood trauma - some 'minor' chronic diseases like eczema and chronic sinusitis and my immune system seems to be the worst in my FOC (viruses never seem to pass me by and I always take longest to recover) - and there might be more in store that could be directly related to my childhood trauma. The hard facts that after having survived childhood trauma, there is also an ill effect on the lifelong health is something that always gets to me very deeply - doubly unfair!

That's why it's twice as important that we do all we can to break the cycle of abuse.

I am very glad that doctors like Nadine are on the case for this and future generations of children. It's important to pass on the message and make people aware of the health risks that come from childhood trauma.

*

Kizzie

  • Administrator
  • Member
  • 8650
    • View Profile
Re: Health effects over a lifetime of childhood trauma (might be triggering)
« Reply #1 on: February 18, 2015, 11:35:30 PM »
This study is a bit depressing but it definitely confirms the effects of childhood trauma on health. The "Adverse Childhood Experiences (ACE) Study" - http://www.cdc.gov/violenceprevention/acestudy/index.html

*

Anamiame

  • Member
  • 139
    • View Profile
Re: Health effects over a lifetime of childhood trauma (might be triggering)
« Reply #2 on: February 19, 2015, 12:49:33 AM »
I have the heart issues (ischemia) and Lupus, and autoimmune disease.  I've always wondered if there is a correlation between Lupus and childhood abuse.  I tend to think there is because the majority of people I know who have been diagnosed have abusive histories.  My rheumy says no--it's genetic only.  True, you have to have the DNA pre-cursor for Lupus, but in many people, it is never 'triggered' because Lupus starts with the immune system having to be activated, like stress, a car accident or an illness.  I would think childhood abuse would be that trigger.  I believe that in my case anyhow.

*

alovelycreature

  • Member
  • 165
    • View Profile
Re: Health effects over a lifetime of childhood trauma (might be triggering)
« Reply #3 on: February 19, 2015, 02:22:41 AM »
Thanks so much for sharing! This lady is one of my new heros.

I'm 26 and I already have a load of issues. I've always had terrible allergies, and 2014 was the first time in 6+ years I didn't have a sinus infection! I used to get sick every other month, and I've been getting sick less but still a lot. Also have IBS, low blood sugar, memory problems, sleeping issues, etc. All symptoms of high cortisol.

I started taking a bunch of vitamins over the past 6 months and I think they've been helping. A sublingual B-complex, extra B6, magnesium (really helped with muscle aches), vitamin E, and vitamin C.

I found this interesting blog on high cortisol. The link starts on the 3rd part of the blog, so you might want to go back to part one. http://www.medicinegarden.com/2011/02/20/high-cortisol-part-3/

*

lonewolf

  • Member
  • 77
    • View Profile
This study is a bit depressing but it definitely confirms the effects of childhood trauma on health. The "Adverse Childhood Experiences (ACE) Study" - http://www.cdc.gov/violenceprevention/acestudy/index.html.

This is an excellent study -- it's what lead me to CPTSD (and now here). Because I was not physically/sexually abused as a child I had always assumed that I hadn't experienced any trauma. I scored 6/10. The graphs were more shocking to me when I saw what behaviours I was susceptible to with such a high score (and yes, many of them do apply to me). It literally sent me off the edge of the cliff for a few weeks, but I amso relieved despite all of the negative emotions have since bubbled to the surface. It was a trigger of sorts, but I'm so glad I discovered it. It was very validating on so many levels.