Complex PTSD Diagnosis

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Kizzie

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Complex PTSD Diagnosis
« on: February 20, 2019, 06:54:44 PM »
Despite trauma professionals/stakeholders using the term Complex PTSD since Judith Herman first identified it in 1992, until recently it has not been an official diagnostic construct in either of the two main diagnostic manuals (the American Psychological Association's DSM or the World Health Organization's ICD). This changed in 2018:

In June of 2018, the World Health Organization (WHO) diagnostic system, the International Classification of Diseases and Related Health Problems (ICD) formally introduced a diagnosis of complex PTSD (CPTSD). In ICD-11, PTSD and CPTSD fall under a general parent category of Disorders Specifically Related to Stress.  PTSD consists of 3 core elements or clusters: re-experiencing of the traumatic event in the present, avoidance of traumatic reminders, and a sense of current threat. This formulation conceptualizes PTSD as a conditioned fear response and emphasizes symptoms that tie the disorder directly to traumatic events (Brewin et al., 2009).  CPTSD includes the 3 core elements of PTSD as well as 3 additional elements that reflect the impact that trauma can have on systems of self-organization, specifically problems in emotion regulation, self-concept, and relational domains under conditions of sustained, multiple or repeated traumatic exposure.

Hopefully this will mean that being 'officially' diagnosed will get easier now and we will have coverage for the treatment & services we need.

Reference

ISTSS Position Paper on Complex PTSD in Adults






 
« Last Edit: February 20, 2019, 06:57:01 PM by Kizzie »

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Three Roses

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Re: Complex PTSD Diagnosis
« Reply #1 on: February 20, 2019, 07:04:51 PM »
  :applause:

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Kizzie

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Re: Complex PTSD Diagnosis
« Reply #2 on: May 15, 2019, 06:20:26 PM »
A great article by Bessel van der Kolk "The Politics of Mental Health" which does a lot to explain why Complex PTSD/Trauma has not been included in the APA's DSM.  Here's an excerpt:

PTSD was a pretty good diagnosis for war veterans, but it was clear that there’s a much larger population of traumatized people. For every vet who comes back messed up, there are at least 30 kids who get abused, molested, abandoned, and neglected at home. Even though they’re quite different from combat vets in many ways, they show many of the same symptoms. In response to our lobbying, the American Psychiatric Association funded a field trial for a new diagnosis: complex PTSD or DESNOS. After that study was completed, the PTSD committee voted 19 to 2 to create a new diagnosis in the DSM. But to our amazement, that diagnosis was eventually left out of the DSM-IV, despite overwhelming research evidence for a much more complex developmental response to trauma.