Blood work correlation to depression?

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Sceal

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Blood work correlation to depression?
« on: August 15, 2019, 01:27:44 AM »
It's 0300 where I am at. I'm usually not awake at this hour, but my head was drowning in thoughts.

My GP asked me today if I would consider medication for depression. I said no. The side effect risks are too high. I don't want to risk them.
But then, just now I had a thought. I also got my b12 injection today and although things aren't good... It's been a better day. So I wonder;

Could one become more vulnerable to a round of depression if one is low (or too high) in some of the various vitamins, minerals or other traceable things we got going on on the inside?
I do know that lack of vitamin D and Bs can cause problems for mental health. But is there things one can check for and then prevent the vulnerability?

It's 3 in the morning so I am not sure if this is making any sense. I sent my GP a message hopefully she'll get back to me before the weekend

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Tee

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Re: Blood work correlation to depression?
« Reply #1 on: August 15, 2019, 01:32:23 AM »
 :hug: I think everything works together and if there's an imbalance it can throw things off.  But I'm not a doctor is be interested to hear what your GP says. :grouphug: night

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Snowdrop

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Re: Blood work correlation to depression?
« Reply #2 on: August 15, 2019, 03:57:16 AM »
Vaguely related, but I read a book a few years ago that talked about the relationship between depression and inflammation. Could be worth looking in to?

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Sceal

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Re: Blood work correlation to depression?
« Reply #3 on: August 15, 2019, 05:51:07 AM »
To Tee:
She might just go "no, you are being silly"  ;D

To Snowdrop:
I already have chronic low grade inflammation due to another hormonal imbalance syndrom, but that's a constant and I am not always in a depressive episode. This one has lasted about 3 months now, but without increased inflammation symptoms.

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MoonBeam

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Re: Blood work correlation to depression?
« Reply #4 on: August 15, 2019, 05:23:51 PM »
Hi Sceal. I've talked with my GP about this a fair amount. My T recommended meds and I didn't want to go that route either--mostly because I'm afraid I will never be able to get off of them and I am afraid of taking meds--part of my trauma.
 
We talked about things I could try with diet and exercise, ways to help me sleep better naturally and supplements. B vitamins, L-Thianine (an amino acid) have been helpful to me. Not a cure-all, but I do find when I take them I notice a lift in the heaviness.  I think I'm deficient in most vitamins and minerals most of the time--something I'm wanting to look at as I move into learning about self-care. 

Also wanted to say there are links between iron deficiency or anemia and anxiety symptoms. So, yeah, I totally think its worth exploring these things with your GP.  I hope there is support there for you. Thanks for posting this. It's a really good reminder for me. I forget when I'm in it.

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Jazzy

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Re: Blood work correlation to depression?
« Reply #5 on: August 15, 2019, 11:04:15 PM »
My ex has a vitamin B12 deficiency, and when you're low it will certainly aggravate depression. It is quite notable to someone close, at least in my case. Anyway, if you're prone to depression its good to make sure you're at a healthy level of all your physical needs. Vitamins, minerals, sugar levels etc.

I fought against medication for a long time, but now I take some, and it makes a tremendous difference (in a good way). It wasn't a very easy process for me. It took about 5 years to find something I was comfortable with. But, I'd strongly agree if your doc is recommending it. Side effects are certainly a thing, and can be problematic, but if you can keep track of all that it will really help to find a good one for you.  It's a risk/reward thing I guess. There's a big reward, I think it is at least worth a try.  Anyway, all the best. Take care! :)


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Sceal

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Re: Blood work correlation to depression?
« Reply #6 on: August 17, 2019, 02:28:43 PM »
Hi Sceal. I've talked with my GP about this a fair amount. My T recommended meds and I didn't want to go that route either--mostly because I'm afraid I will never be able to get off of them and I am afraid of taking meds--part of my trauma.
 
We talked about things I could try with diet and exercise, ways to help me sleep better naturally and supplements. B vitamins, L-Thianine (an amino acid) have been helpful to me. Not a cure-all, but I do find when I take them I notice a lift in the heaviness.  I think I'm deficient in most vitamins and minerals most of the time--something I'm wanting to look at as I move into learning about self-care. 

Also wanted to say there are links between iron deficiency or anemia and anxiety symptoms. So, yeah, I totally think its worth exploring these things with your GP.  I hope there is support there for you. Thanks for posting this. It's a really good reminder for me. I forget when I'm in it.

Yeah, I do follow all the advice when the depression hits: Continue eating generally healthy (although, we all know there will be unhealthy stuff as well - but just trying to keep the main meals healthy you know?), keep up the exercise - being active in some form or another regularly, stay in touch with people. Go do the social thing, even if it is exhausting, scary and overwhelming. Do the things I used to love,  you know, all the clever advice out there that is non-medicated ways of beating depressions.  But I feel that although it probably prevents me going into the deepest darkness, it doesn't lift me out of the depressions.

I haven't heard back from my GP, either she thinks I'm a loony or she's looking into it. Or she hasn't seen my message yet.

I didnt know about the iron deficiency though! That's interessting. Personally I am on iron everyday and will have to be for the rest of my life.

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Sceal

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Re: Blood work correlation to depression?
« Reply #7 on: August 17, 2019, 02:35:31 PM »
My ex has a vitamin B12 deficiency, and when you're low it will certainly aggravate depression. It is quite notable to someone close, at least in my case. Anyway, if you're prone to depression its good to make sure you're at a healthy level of all your physical needs. Vitamins, minerals, sugar levels etc.

I fought against medication for a long time, but now I take some, and it makes a tremendous difference (in a good way). It wasn't a very easy process for me. It took about 5 years to find something I was comfortable with. But, I'd strongly agree if your doc is recommending it. Side effects are certainly a thing, and can be problematic, but if you can keep track of all that it will really help to find a good one for you.  It's a risk/reward thing I guess. There's a big reward, I think it is at least worth a try.  Anyway, all the best. Take care! :)

I have to take b12 injections every 2 months for the rest of my life due to a surgery I had that affects my uptake of it. My levels had been nearly double the amount of normal levels though, so my GP and I prolonged my last B12 injection about a month. But I've felt better after my last injection this week.

I'm generally very dilligent with bloodwork. I'm being tested quite frequently. Probably more than I've needed to be for the last few years. So I'm fairly sure I got that bit under control.

I was over-medicated during the first few years of my meeting with psychiatrists. It gave me long-lasting side effects that's present even today - 14 years later. For me, the side effects and the risk with them are not worth it. I ended up having to have surgery partially based due to them. I have tried out various of drugs for depression - and I have to say I never felt they did much for me at all other than give me side-effects that generally made me feel so much worse about myself. But this is my experience. I do know that these drugs do work better for other people. And for some people it is their life-line. And it's wonderful to hear everytime they do work for someone. So I am glad you have found medication that is working for you.

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Jazzy

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Re: Blood work correlation to depression?
« Reply #8 on: August 17, 2019, 11:22:44 PM »
Sorry to hear you've had such a rough time of it. I guess we're all a little bit different, chemically, right? Its good you keep up on your blood work. Hopefully that will keep you on a good track.