Do we think other mental health issues are childhood trauma?

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johnram

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Do we think other mental health issues are childhood trauma?
« on: November 16, 2021, 07:27:25 AM »
I am wary of generalising, but i sometimes think that a lot of mental health issues (outside of cPTSD), likely have a childhood basis, especially those with say depression or addiction, but dont know the why.

I say that partly given my bad experiences in therapy, where the therapist wouldnt go near my mothers schizophrenia and its impact on me as an infant and child being left alone with her.  In the same way, i think there is a lot of therapists are treating symptoms that are actually rooted in childhood?

i am aware some things are purely biological - i am putting that to one side

its a discussion, i am biased as i have cPTSD, but seeing what others think?

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sweetsixty

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Re: Do we think other mental health issues are childhood trauma?
« Reply #1 on: November 16, 2021, 08:09:41 AM »
Iíve just finished reading ďWhat Happened to YouĒ By Oprah Winfrey and Dr Bruce Parry and itís the best book Iíve ever read on this issue. Believe me Iíve read many!

If the theories are correct then much of todayís maladies are based in childhood trauma. The explanation in there of how indigenous people deal with trauma, which lets face it, has been a part of the human existence forever although different now to the woolly mammal phase, is very illuminating.

From depression to bipolar to ADHD and CPTSD.  The explanation of the brains development and the susceptibility of the infant brain to real physiological change is a real eye opener. I highly recommend it. Itís definitely made me re-examine  all my relationships and view my children and grandchildren in a different light. I also saw my M for what she was but that doesnít mean I forgive her.

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johnram

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Re: Do we think other mental health issues are childhood trauma?
« Reply #2 on: November 16, 2021, 11:31:32 AM »
Glad to meet you @sweetsixty

That book is wonderful isnt it.  Such an easy ready with the dialogue back and forth.  Oprah put me off initially but its such a great book, so clear and simple.

I love the story of the boy and the smell of the aftershave, just shows how these things impact the nervous system at such a deep and unconsious level



Iíve just finished reading ďWhat Happened to YouĒ By Oprah Winfrey and Dr Bruce Parry and itís the best book Iíve ever read on this issue. Believe me Iíve read many!

If the theories are correct then much of todayís maladies are based in childhood trauma. The explanation in there of how indigenous people deal with trauma, which lets face it, has been a part of the human existence forever although different now to the woolly mammal phase, is very illuminating.

From depression to bipolar to ADHD and CPTSD.  The explanation of the brains development and the susceptibility of the infant brain to real physiological change is a real eye opener. I highly recommend it. Itís definitely made me re-examine  all my relationships and view my children and grandchildren in a different light. I also saw my M for what she was but that doesnít mean I forgive her.

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Bermuda

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Re: Do we think other mental health issues are childhood trauma?
« Reply #3 on: November 16, 2021, 12:24:03 PM »
Absolutely. I can only speak for myself, of course.

I have had C-PTSD responses that have manifected in various ways in varying degrees throughout the course of my life. In the time when they were absolutely the worst, and at this point I already knew that I had some kind of PTSD, I still treated these responses individually as individual problems.

I self medicated, like a lot of us. I took a lot of anxiety medication, illegally, although if I weren't so afraid of doctors I surely could have gotten it legally. I drank. I drank with said medication *intentionally* to forget. I took antacids. At one point I had an overdose on antacids. I didn't even know that was a thing. My self-medicating was also a problem, although I wouldn't have recognised it at the time.

When people asked I would have listed these possible disorders separately. For example: I had severe social anxiety, insomnia, I was depressed, I thought I was sociopathic, I had and still have the physical effects of childhood trauma, autoimmune diseases and I get physically ill when I am upset. Looking back now 20 years in the future, I know that no amount of anxiety medication would have solved my problem. No amount of antacids could have solved my problem. I was never sociopathic, although certainly depressed. I know now with certainty that most of my problems were based in childhood trauma, because I don't have those symptoms to the same extent now and I don't medicate. I can see looking back how they fit together. I was depressed because my life was depressing. I was sick because my life was sickening. I was anxious because I felt I had to live in fear to survive. I thought I was sociopathic because I couldn't relate to other people's feelings and I thought the only way to survive was to play life like Chess... and possibly the self-medicating didn't help with that either.

At least for me, my childhood trauma and C-PTSD were the root of several other disorders that were/are absolutely real. I feel I have to disclaimer that, because I have had doctors tell me things are somatic as if that means they don't exist. They do exist. It's just the shadow of the monster. Trauma was the real monster.

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johnram

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Re: Do we think other mental health issues are childhood trauma?
« Reply #4 on: November 16, 2021, 01:18:05 PM »
I feel the same @Bermuda

I first went to therapy with addiction, and then slowly it became clear there was more, but my first therapist never used the word trauma or something similar - i despise her for this, and a few other things. 

Talking talking and talking about how i was in the present never considered my childhood properly. 

Its why i think CBT is nonsense, its tape rather than root cause fixing



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rainydiary

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Re: Do we think other mental health issues are childhood trauma?
« Reply #5 on: November 16, 2021, 01:43:27 PM »
I think it makes sense that a lot of what we face as adults is the result of our upbringing. 

I have also been thinking a lot about how the trauma of my parents and grandparents and other ancestors are encoded in my genes.  They are encoded in my genes because those folks werenít able to face or understand or acknowledge their trauma.

This honestly messes with my head because it is hard to reconcile how I was with treated with the knowledge that my parents werenít/arenít ok either. 

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johnram

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Re: Do we think other mental health issues are childhood trauma?
« Reply #6 on: November 16, 2021, 02:09:41 PM »
I had a similar response on the generational trauma thing, i think we need to fix what is ours, and accept that our parents might be messed up but its not our fault - we can have empathy, but we still deserved better - it isnt an excuse!!

my take anyway
 

I think it makes sense that a lot of what we face as adults is the result of our upbringing. 

I have also been thinking a lot about how the trauma of my parents and grandparents and other ancestors are encoded in my genes.  They are encoded in my genes because those folks werenít able to face or understand or acknowledge their trauma.

This honestly messes with my head because it is hard to reconcile how I was with treated with the knowledge that my parents werenít/arenít ok either.

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Bermuda

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Re: Do we think other mental health issues are childhood trauma?
« Reply #7 on: November 16, 2021, 05:47:22 PM »
I couldn't agree with both of you more. My therapy experience was the same, and my therapist put extra emphasis on grounding me into the present.

Before I became a parent I absolutely realised that my own mother never faced her trauma for what it was and rather married and birthed children as was expected if her, as was expected of her mother, etc.. In this regard I'm glad I took the time to completely fall apart and rebuild myself from the beginning.

Relational trauma effects everything.