Books

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Kizzie

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Books
« on: August 23, 2014, 06:18:22 PM »
Be sure and check out our "Books" section here.

Also, if you have a good book or article you've read that relates to CPTSD in one way or another, please feel free to share it here.   :yes:
« Last Edit: September 11, 2018, 05:44:35 PM by Kizzie »

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Kizzie

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Out of the FOG Book - Personality Disorders
« Reply #1 on: August 23, 2014, 06:23:11 PM »
This book was developed by volunteers from the popular online community for people dealing with someone in their lives who has a personality disorder (PD) "Out of the FOG."   It contains a wealth of information based on the experience and knowledge of members, and is a great resource for anyone who  developed CPTSD as a result of the ongoing/repeated trauma of dealing with someone with a PD. 

See -  http://outofthefog.net/forum/index.php?topic=7583
« Last Edit: August 26, 2014, 06:48:03 PM by Kizzie »

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globetrotter

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Waking the Tiger: Healing Trauma by Peter Levine
« Reply #2 on: August 26, 2014, 02:10:46 AM »
Waking the Tiger : Healing Trauma : The Innate Capacity to Transform Overwhelming Experiences - a book on Somatic Experiencing by Peter Levine, the developer of SE.

I'm reading through it for the second time. The first time was two years ago; now I'm reading it after two years of therapy and a lot of new awareness.
« Last Edit: January 08, 2015, 10:48:50 PM by Kizzie »

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Kizzie

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Healing the Shame that Binds You - John Bradshaw
« Reply #3 on: August 26, 2014, 07:06:49 PM »
John Bradshaw's seminal book on shame - "Healing the Shame that Binds You" (2005 revised edition).  One of the main characteristics of CPTSD is a pervasive sense of shame which as Bradshaw suggests   "...limits the development of self esteem and causes anxiety and depression, and limits our ability to be connected in relationships." I read the first edition years ago when I was a member of a group Adult Children of Alcoholics (ACoA) and found it very useful as he spends a good part of the book talking about strategies for recovery.

http://www.johnbradshaw.com/Healingtheshameprint.aspx

Added 13 Sep 2014 - I browsed through the current edition of Toxic Shame and wanted to add a caution here.  Bradshaw's work does contain references to the 12 Step Program and concepts Alcoholic Anonymous uses for recovery.  This is troublesome for me and apparently for others based on the following which is taken from a workbook "Surviving to Thriving" from the Australian web site "Adult Survivors of Childhood Abuse (http://www.ascasupport.org/manual.php):

ASCA is a recovery program based on psychological concepts of recovery. While many ideas represented in 12-Step programs may be
valuable for survivors of child abuse, some are not. In particular, many survivors have difficulty with the idea of "surrendering to a higher power." The challenge for many survivors is to find the power to change within oneself, not in an outside source. This is related to the fact that, for most survivors, the source of power and control was always located outside of themselves, in their parent or other abuser.

To find the power to change from within is to break old, persistent patterns. Some survivors also have problems with some 12-Step programs' recurring
themes of forgiveness, blame and misplaced responsibility. 12-Step programs start with the belief that the individual has committed wrongs, is responsible for those wrongs and must make amends to others for those wrongs. These beliefs are not particularly applicable to survivors of child abuse. Adult survivors were abused as children. As children, they had no control or choice over the abuse, and it was not their fault that the abuse occurred. The abuse was the doing of another person (or persons), and many adult survivors do not feel that they should make amends for behavior that was not their responsibility and over which they had no control.


Bradshaw's book does contain much good information about toxic shame but if you read it, please keep the above in mind. 

« Last Edit: January 08, 2015, 10:49:17 PM by Kizzie »

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globetrotter

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Re: Books
« Reply #4 on: August 27, 2014, 11:19:24 AM »
I started the hunt for a follow up to Walkers book.
Tough act to follow! I watched Bradshaw in the 80s and am looking at
Trauma Treatment Handbook by Robin Shapiro
because it has good reviews and exercises to do.
I think the exercises would help me as it forces me to take time to think. I'm much too easily distracted by the outside world (but getting better at avoidance!) vs channeling energy into battling inner demons.
Does any one know this book or others with exercises? I feel I'm past the intro work and need a bit deeper material...
Thanks.

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globetrotter

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Re: Books
« Reply #5 on: August 27, 2014, 11:49:08 AM »
Oops...that Book by Shapiro is for therapists...
Well then. Does anyone know a book with exercises?

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Kizzie

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Re: Books
« Reply #6 on: August 27, 2014, 07:11:49 PM »
Are you looking for a particular kind of exercise GT?  I know there are quite a few good books on Cognitive Behavioural Therapy, but not sure if that's what you're looking for.

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globetrotter

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Re: Books
« Reply #7 on: August 27, 2014, 11:18:10 PM »

Some kind of exercises that will aid in digging deeper with the self exploration and touch into feelings. For example, a friend has been tasked with writing a letter to her mother, which she'll never send, but that type of thing has to be healing (and hey, I think I may try that).

Writing is helpful, but sometimes it would help to have an assignment or a topic, direction, etc., or even some subject to think about with the purpose of aiding healing. Art therapy sites are good for that, but I'm looking for ways to keep focused and keep working. Reading and therapy are good, but I need another direction of push. Does that make sense? I suppose there are probably a few websites if no books, specifically.

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Kizzie

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Healing from Trauma: A Survivor's Guide by J. Cori
« Reply #8 on: August 30, 2014, 04:47:13 AM »
I fouund what looks to be a good book today GT - it's called "Healing from Trauma: A Survivor's Guide to Understanding your Symptoms and Reclaiming your Life (2007) by Jasmin Lee Cori. It isn't about CPTSD specifically but a lot of what she discusses seem to be related to it. 

The description reads as follows:

While there are many different approaches to healing trauma, few offer a wide range of perspectives and options. With innovative insight into trauma-related difficulties, Jasmin Lee Cori helps you:

Understand trauma and its devastating impacts Identify symptoms of trauma (dissociation, numbing, etc.) and common mental health problems that stem from trauma
Manage traumatic reactions and memories
Create a more balanced life that supports your recovery
Choose appropriate interventions (therapies, self-help groups, medications and alternatives)
Recognize how far you've come in your healing and what you need to keep growing

Complete with exercises, healing stories, points to remember, and resources, this is a perfect companion for anyone seeking to reclaim their life from the devastating impacts of trauma.


Link - http://www.amazon.ca/Healing-Trauma-Survivors-Understanding-Reclaiming/dp/1600940617
« Last Edit: January 08, 2015, 10:51:14 PM by Kizzie »

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globetrotter

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Re: Books
« Reply #9 on: August 31, 2014, 12:02:22 AM »
Thanks, Kizzie! - I like what I'm seeing in the table of contents. I think I'll check it out.

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Kizzie

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Re: Books
« Reply #10 on: August 31, 2014, 06:01:19 PM »
No prob  :) 

Can you let us know if you do get it what you think? 

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globetrotter

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Re: Books
« Reply #11 on: September 02, 2014, 11:46:09 PM »
Yes, I sure will...taking a break with some fiction before I go back to dealing with the brainwreck!

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Kizzie

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Workbook for Adult Survivors of Child Abuse
« Reply #12 on: September 13, 2014, 05:54:41 PM »
Hey GT (and everyone) - I found a new web site today which has some free downloads including workbooks such as "Survivor to Thriver" -   http://www.ascasupport.org/_html_manuals/survivortothriver/index.html.  It's a bit older (1995) but has lots of exercises including a three stage self-help recovery plan (1 - Remembering; 2 - Mourning; and, 3 - Healing).   

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globetrotter

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Re: Books
« Reply #13 on: September 14, 2014, 03:06:33 PM »
thanks, Kizzie - this looks like the kind of thing I was looking for. I think the journal prompts will be helpful.

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Kizzie

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Re: Books
« Reply #14 on: September 14, 2014, 03:42:34 PM »
Yes I thought so too - it maps out a route of stages and steps which is helpful and can be used with Walker's material.

Onward!