Marsha Linehan-Radical Acceptance Model

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BeHea1thy

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Marsha Linehan-Radical Acceptance Model
« on: August 16, 2015, 06:48:55 PM »
This may interest members here. I include it because as a group, we've been exposed to many different "therapies": cognitive behavior therapy, neuro-linguistic programming, mindfulness, Zen Buddhism, problem solving, etc. Along the way, we may have brushed up against dialectical behavioral therapy, usually associated with a borderline personality diagnosis.

My own interest is in her specific technique called Radical Acceptance. This is before Tara Brach made a splash with it. I came across a site which clearly spelled out how to go from resistance and "willfulness" to acceptance and "willingness." http://www.dbtselfhelp.com/html/radical_acceptance_text.html. This naturally led me to finding out more about Marsha. I was surprised to learn that she had come through her own "fire" as a teen and emerged more or less intact to develop her model and most importantly, rescue others.

Her story is told here, in her own words. http://www.nytimes.com/2011/06/23/health/23lives.html?pagewanted=all&_r=0 Just a little side note- New York Times limits views of their articles to 10 per month for free. After that, I assume it's blocked unless you pay. Since everyone would be logging in from a different IP, I figured I could share the joy.

I hope that the transition from late summer to fall will be a smooth one for guests and members.   :yes:

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woodsgnome

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Re: Marsha Linehan-Radical Acceptance Model
« Reply #1 on: August 19, 2015, 04:03:58 PM »
Thanks for posting this and the other resources you've pointed out, BeHea1thy. The internet is so awash in this/that/other nowadays it makes for tricky navigating to find what really holds promise.

I've been quite attracted to the different people now focusing on the acceptance approach. It seems to combine practicality with hope while also tamping down the expectations that challenge credulity.

My biggest stumbling block is finding self-acceptance, by far, the "if-I'd-only-done-this-or-known-that" game. It's like looking over, seeing the vast canyon yet to cross (complete with rickety swinging bridges!), then glancing back at the graveyard of lost illusions, finally taking that deep breath, and then...