Superhero therapy

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Sceal

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Superhero therapy
« on: November 19, 2017, 08:11:19 PM »
Hi there!

About a year ago a friend of mine linked me the page of a therapist in the USA.
It's not really about CPTSD, but often about trauma. And I kind of like having a wider-aspect of looking at articles and things that can help. She talks alot about trauma and using superheroes to get through the rough stuff.
The therapist herself is a survivor of the Chernobyl accident in 1986, and develloped PTSD from it and other things.
If you're a geek like me, I think you'll like her:

http://www.superhero-therapy.com/

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ah

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Re: Superhero therapy
« Reply #1 on: November 20, 2017, 09:46:30 PM »
Thanks, I like very much. "a (mad?) scientist, intending to take over the world with geek culture and compassion."  :yes:


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Sceal

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Re: Superhero therapy
« Reply #2 on: November 20, 2017, 09:59:32 PM »
 :cheer: I am happy you like it   :)

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DecimalRocket

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Re: Superhero therapy
« Reply #3 on: November 21, 2017, 10:50:09 AM »
This stuff is amazing.

Reminds me when I read a book about physics using superhero examples. It also reminds me of the site Nerd Fitness a health site with similar geeky authors who like to use superhero analogies.

Now if only this type of superhero mixing can spread around different interests. Haha.

World domination is near. . .

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I like vanilla

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Re: Superhero therapy
« Reply #4 on: November 21, 2017, 03:18:47 PM »
I like the idea of superhero therapy, and have on occasion sought them out myself.

But, I have also hit the wall that virtually all of the superheroes out there (in the comic-book-and-other-mass-media sense) are male. And the female ones tend to be half naked and/or weaker/'less' than their male counterparts. So, I have never really been able to find a superhero that I connect with and am often triggered by the ones that are out there (I was called a 'tomboy' as a child because apparently I was 'doing gender wrong' by playing outside instead of baking with dollies in the kitchen). Admittedly, Violet and Helen on the Incredibles are fairly good ones.

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Three Roses

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Re: Superhero therapy
« Reply #5 on: November 21, 2017, 04:07:47 PM »
Jessica Jones. I agree, she's not really a super hero, and most of them are male, but this girl is intelligent and fully clothed in addition to being really, really strong. On Netflix, one season.

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Sceal

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Re: Superhero therapy
« Reply #6 on: November 21, 2017, 07:21:11 PM »
There are a few women superheroes who doesn't dress slutty, most of my examples I think comes from the X-men universe. Jean Grey, Rogue, Molly Hayes to mention a few. I don't know much about Kamala Khan, but I think she'll be one to look out for. I know a few who's a really big fan of She-Hulk who started out as "weaker" than the Hulk, but then became just as strong.

My favourites from childhood were Agent X9 and Xena the warrior princess. Both, however, are fitted in skimpy outfits. But at that age, I didn't even notice.

There are a bunch of fictional characters that aren't superheroes, but are also noteworthy. The Harry Potter fan in me screams: Professor McGonagall and Hermoine.  I enjoy Mulan, and oh, cannot forget Korra.

I thought Jessica Jones were considered a superhero though. She got superstrength and resistance to injury. I'd say that's quite something.

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ah

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Re: Superhero therapy
« Reply #7 on: November 21, 2017, 09:59:31 PM »
Resistance to injury? Sounds heavenly :yes: can we all have a bit of that, please..?