The right to be a person

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Blueberry

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Re: The right to be a person
« Reply #15 on: December 17, 2017, 02:16:53 PM »
Something that happens to me is that if I was more dissociated, I would be totally fine with going to a stranger and tell him/her my life. I talked about it to my new T and she told me that it would be really violent (we say it this way in Spain) and she is right. I think that when you are used to violence, nothing is violent to you. Things like respect, common sense... don't make sense, because that is something people know because they feel them, but I don't feel anything... at least when I don't try to. Telling your life to a complete stranger, even if it is your new T, is violent...

That's interesting. Different cultures see things differently, use words that other cultures wouldn't. Does your T mean that you are being violent towards yourself or towards the other person?

I'm not sure that telling your life to a new T is violent or somehow inappropriate. The T should be able to protect themselves properly and help you not say too much. If need be, T knows how to set gentle limits, get you back on track where you need to be.

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BlancaLap

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Re: The right to be a person
« Reply #16 on: December 17, 2017, 03:15:10 PM »
Something that happens to me is that if I was more dissociated, I would be totally fine with going to a stranger and tell him/her my life. I talked about it to my new T and she told me that it would be really violent (we say it this way in Spain) and she is right. I think that when you are used to violence, nothing is violent to you. Things like respect, common sense... don't make sense, because that is something people know because they feel them, but I don't feel anything... at least when I don't try to. Telling your life to a complete stranger, even if it is your new T, is violent...

That's interesting. Different cultures see things differently, use words that other cultures wouldn't. Does your T mean that you are being violent towards yourself or towards the other person?

I'm not sure that telling your life to a new T is violent or somehow inappropriate. The T should be able to protect themselves properly and help you not say too much. If need be, T knows how to set gentle limits, get you back on track where you need to be.

I don't know how to explain it, but saying something would be violent can mean it would be extremely inappropriate or awkward or that the other person may feel... uncomfortable. That's when we say it is violent. What I mean is that violence is not a pleasant or comfortable thing, and when we get used to it, things stop making us feel uncomfortable...

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Blueberry

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Re: The right to be a person
« Reply #17 on: December 18, 2017, 08:12:26 PM »
BTW you obviously have a new T, Blanca! I hope T turns out better for you than the psychiatrist.

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BlancaLap

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Re: The right to be a person
« Reply #18 on: December 18, 2017, 08:31:00 PM »
BTW you obviously have a new T, Blanca! I hope T turns out better for you than the psychiatrist.

I hope it too, thanks Blueberry. Btw, tomorrow I have a meeting with my psychiatrist... I don't trust her, and I don't want to keep the medication... I think the best I can do is to fake I'm ok now, like I have less dissociation even if it's not true, but I don't want to fake. Of course if I say I'm not better she is gonna give me more medication. And my mother is going to be there, watching everything and making sure she is in control of everything... I wish things weren't like they are. What do I do, say I'm better now? Do I fake?